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Twelve days in May : Freedom Ride 1961 / Larry Dane Brimner.

Available copies

  • 3 of 3 copies available at Kenton County.

Current holds

0 current holds with 3 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Covington Branch 323.1196 B857t 2017 (Text) 33126021871243 YA Nonfiction Available -
Erlanger Branch 323.1196 B857t 2017 (Text) 33126021871227 YA Nonfiction Available -
Wm. E. Durr Branch 323.1196 B857t 2017 (Text) 33126021871235 YA Nonfiction Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 1629795860
  • ISBN: 9781629795867
  • Physical Description: 111 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: Honesdale, Pennsylvania : Calkins Creek, an imprint of Hightlights, 2017.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary, etc.:
For twelve history-making days in May 1961, thirteen black and white civil rights activists, also known as the Freedom Riders, traveled by bus into the South to draw attention to the unconstitutional segregation still taking place. Despite their peaceful protests, the Freedom Riders were met with increasing violence the further south they traveled.
Awards Note:
Siebert Informational Award, 2018.
Subject: Freedom Rides, 1961.
Civil rights movements > Southern States > History > 20th century.
African Americans > Civil rights > Southern States > History > 20th century.
Civil rights workers > United States > Biography.
African American civil rights workers > Biography.

  • Baker & Taylor
    Documents the heroic 1961 campaign of the civil rights activists known as the "Freedom Riders," describing their peaceful protests to raise awareness about unconstitutional segregation and the increasing violence they endured as they traveled south.
  • Baker & Taylor
    Documents the heroic 1961 campaign of the civil rights activists known as the "Freedom Riders," describing their peaceful protests to raise awareness about unconstitutional segregation and the increasing violence they endured as they traveled south. 10,000 first printing.
  • Perseus Publishing
    For twelve history-making days in May 1961, thirteen black and white civil rights activists, also known as the “Freedom Riders,” traveled by bus into the South to draw attention to the unconstitutional segregation still taking place. Despite their peaceful protests, the Freedom Riders were met with increasing violence the further south they traveled.
  • Perseus Publishing

    A 2018 Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award Winner

    On May 4, 1961, a group of thirteen black and white civil rights activists launched the Freedom Ride, aiming to challenge the practice of segregation on buses and at bus terminal facilities in the South.

    The Ride would last twelve days. Despite the fact that segregation on buses crossing state lines was ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1946, and segregation in interstate transportation facilities was ruled unconstitutional in 1960, these rulings were routinely ignored in the South. The thirteen Freedom Riders intended to test the laws and draw attention to the lack of enforcement with their peaceful protest. As the Riders traveled deeper into the South, they encountered increasing violence and opposition. Noted civil rights author Larry Dane Brimner relies on archival documents and rarely seen images to tell the riveting story of the little-known first days of the Freedom Ride. With author’s note, source notes, bibliography, and index.


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