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Atomic accidents : a history of nuclear meltdowns and disasters : from the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima / James Mahaffey.

Mahaffey, James A., (author.).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kenton County.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Erlanger Branch 363.1799 M214a 2014 (Text) 33126019855232 Adult Nonfiction Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 1605984922
  • ISBN: 9781605984926
  • Physical Description: xxi, 442 pages, 16 pages of unnumbered plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
  • Edition: First Pegasus Books edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Pegasus Books, 2014.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 427-432) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
A triumph of Soviet technology -- Bill Crush and the hazards of steam under pressure -- We discover fire -- World War II, and danger beyond comprehension -- A bit of trouble in the great white north -- Birthing pains in Idaho -- Making everything else seem insignificant in the UK -- In nuclear research, even the goof-ups are fascinating -- The atomic man and lessons in fuel processing -- The military almost never lost a nuclear weapon -- The China syndrome plays in Harrisburg and Pripyat -- Tragedy at Fukushima Daiichi -- Caught in the Rickover trap.
Summary, etc.:
A researcher and nuclear energy advocate describes a number of nuclear mishaps, analyzing what happened and why and explains how each of these accidents have furthered the study of the atom and nuclear energy.
From the dozens of American bombs that went missing during the Cold War, to the misuse and misunderstanding of Rickover's nuclear submarine model, to full-scale meltdowns at Windscale, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima, Mahaffey brings new insight into these catastrophes and reveals where scientists and engineers went wrong.
Subject: Nuclear accidents > History.
Disasters > History.
Disasters > history.
Nuclear Energy > history.

  • Baker & Taylor
    A researcher and nuclear energy advocate describes a number of nuclear mishaps, analyzing what happened and why and explains how each of these accidents have furthered the study of the atom and nuclear energy and speculates on what the future may hold.
  • Baker & Taylor
    A researcher and nuclear energy advocate describes a number of nuclear mishaps, analyzing what happened and why and explains how each of these accidents have furthered the study of the atom and nuclear energy.
  • Book News
    A new history of nuclear power written by a research scientist and nuclear power advocate, this book is designed for general readers interested in the topic. Rather than writing pro-nuclear rhetoric, the author gives a general history of nuclear energy in an entertaining popular voice, with a focus on nuclear accidents and disasters. The book looks at each missing nuclear bomb, nuclear vessel gone wrong, or nuclear reactor meltdown, and gives an analysis of what happened and why. The conclusion is that nuclear power is always a technology in development, and therefore always experimental and subject to problems. However, the author argues that past accidents have given scientists and engineers enough information that nuclear power technology can be safe and useful as long as it is built and used properly. But in convincing readers that the technology itself is reliable, the author must document astonishing levels of greed and lack of common sense in the stories of how it's been used. Distributed by W.W. Norton. Annotation ©2015 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)
  • WW Norton
    A gripping narrative of nuclear mishaps and meltdowns around the globe, all of which have proven pivotal to the advancement of nuclear science.
  • WW Norton
    From the moment radiation was discovered in the late nineteenth century, nuclear science has had a rich history of innovative scientific exploration and discovery, coupled with mistakes, accidents, and downright disasters. Mahaffey, a long-time advocate of continued nuclear research and nuclear energy, looks at each incident in turn and analyzes what happened and why, often discovering where scientists went wrong when analyzing past meltdowns.Every incident has lead to new facets in understanding about the mighty atom—and Mahaffey puts forth what the future should be for this final frontier of science that still holds so much promise.

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