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  • 2 of 3 copies available at Kenton County.

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0 current holds with 3 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Covington Branch YA BRAY L (Text) 33126020868307 YA Fiction Available -
Erlanger Branch YA BRAY L (Text) 33126020868299 YA Fiction Available -
Wm. E. Durr Branch YA BRAY L (Text) 33126010619181 YA Fiction Checked out 07/25/2020

Record details

  • ISBN: 0385901615 (GLB)
  • ISBN: 0385730284 (trade)
  • Physical Description: 403 p. ; 22 cm.
    print
  • Publisher: New York, NY : Delacorte Press, 2003.

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.: After the suspicious death of her mother in 1895, sixteen-year-old Gemma returns to England, after many years in India, to attend a finishing school where she becomes aware of her magical powers and ability to see into the spirit world.
Subject: Schools Fiction
Boarding schools Fiction
Paranormal fiction
Magic Fiction
Doyle, Gemma (Fictitious character) Fiction

  • School Library Journal Reviews : SLJ Reviews 2004 February
    Gr 9 Up-An interesting combination of fantasy, light horror, and historical fiction, with a dash of romance thrown in for good measure. On her 16th birthday, Gemma Doyle fights with her mother. She wants to leave India where her family is living, runs off when her mother refuses to send her to London to school, has a dreadful vision and witnesses her mother's death. Two months later, Gemma is enrolled in London's Spence School, still troubled by visions, and unable to share her grief and guilt over her loss. She gradually learns to control her vision and enter the "realms" where magical powers can make anything happen and where her mother waits to instruct her. Gradually she and her new friends learn about the Order, an ancient group of women who maintained the realms and regulated their power, and how two students unleashed an evil creature from the realms by killing a Gypsy girl. Gemma uncovers her mother's connection to those events and learns what she now must do. The fantasy element is obvious, and the boarding-school setting gives a glimpse into a time when girls were taught gentility and the importance of appearances. The author also makes a point about the position of women in Victorian society. Bray's characters are types-Felicity, clever and powerful; Ann, plain and timid; Pippa, beautiful and occasionally thoughtless; Gemma, spirited and chafing under society's rules-but not offensively so, and they do change as the story progresses. The ending leaves open the likelihood of a sequel. Recommend this to fantasy fans who also like Sherlock Holmes or Mary Russell.-Lisa Prolman, Greenfield Public Library, MA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Search Results Showing Item 3 of 4

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