Catalog

Record Details

Catalog Search



Don Quixote / Miguel de Cervantes ; a new ... Read More

Available copies

  • 2 of 3 copies available at Kenton County.

Current holds

0 current holds with 3 total copies.

Show Only Available Copies
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Covington Branch CERVA M (Text) 33126025159249 Adult Fiction Available -
Erlanger Branch CERVA M (Text) 33126025159264 Adult Fiction Checked out 08/29/2022
Wm. E. Durr Branch CERVA M (Text) 33126025159256 Adult Fiction Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0060188707 (alk. paper) :
  • Physical Description: xxxv, 940 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Edition: 1st ed.
  • Publisher: New York : Ecco, c2003.

  • Library Journal Reviews : LJ Reviews July #1
    "Unless you read Spanish, you've never read Don Quixote," boasts the publicity. Now is your chance-grab this new rendition by leading translator Edith Grossman. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
  • Library Journal Reviews : LJ Reviews 2003 November #1
    In 2002, 100 major writers from 54 countries rated Don Quixote the world's best work of fiction. Any new translation of Cervantes's immortal classic is thus a major publishing event, and when that translator is Grossman-the prize-winning interpreter of such contemporary Latin American giants as García Marquez and Vargas Llosa-it is a major event indeed. Grossman's goal was to make the 400-year-old book sound as if it were penned by one of her modern specialties. Using Martin de Riquer's scholarly edition, itself based on the princeps, she translates the text exactly, including the numerous gaps, such as the unexplained theft of Sancho's donkey. Grossman retains the original Latin, of course, but also such Spanish words as ínsula that convey a particular meaning. She modifies the famous opening line of the novel by inserting the word somewhere before "in La Mancha," thereby reinforcing the vagueness of the location. Unlike earlier versions, this Don Quixote doesn't use the antiquated speech of the novels of chivalry that Cervantes is spoofing, thus providing a more readable text. Footnotes, many derived from de Riquer, are kept to a minimum and are included only when an explanation is indispensable; Grossman wants the novel to be read first and revered through the clogging of scholarly apparatus second. The end result of Grossman's two-year labor of love is a Don Quixote that is contemporary without being irreverent, a status Raffel's 1995 effort approached. The older, more faithful standard translations, like those of Putnam (1949), Starkie (1964), and Jarvis (revised 1992) will remain in the canon and in print, as much for their reliability as their quaintness. Where Grossman succeeds is in being faithful to Cervantes's comic spirit and natural style; it is indeed a sign of freshness and spontaneity that this reviewer laughed as if for the first time at passages that he's read many times before. As the literary world prepares for the quadricentennial in 2005 of the publication of Don Quixote's first part and in light of other competing versions, now and possibly to come by then, this is the one to beat. Recommended for all libraries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 7/03.]-Lawrence Olszewski, OCLC Lib., Dublin, OH Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Additional Resources